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Why We Love: Post Animal

If you’ve ever experienced the psychedelic odyssey of sounds produced by Post Animal then I’m sure you’ll be happy to join me in this celebration of their cosmic creations. Alternatively, if you haven’t yet had the pleasure of delving into their discography then I strongly urge you to find out a little bit more about them right here and join the trip…

I can still remember feeling as if I’d hit the jackpot when I discovered Post Animal in the same week that I moved to London back in 2016. At this point, they only had a handful of songs on their Spotify but those few special tracks were enough to recognise the gem that I had on my hands and have me hooked. Played out on repeat, their merging melodies became the soundtrack to my new adventure, discovering their rich sounds as I discovered my way in a new city.

Best described as ‘current psychedelic meets classic rock’ the six-piece progressive outfit formed in Chicago two years prior to my discovery. A variety of members contribute to vocals and consist musically of Dalton Allison on bass, Wesley Toledo on drums and Jake Hirshland on keyboard and guitar; joined on the latter by Javi Reyes, Matt Williams and Joe Keery (a name that you might recognise from a little-known Netflix series called Stranger Things). 

Around the time that I discovered the guys, Keery’s breakout acting gig almost brought everything to a halt, but fortunately, they managed to work around scheduling and were able to carry on producing more of their sonic soundscapes. However, as his role (and hair) on the cult show began to get bigger and some time was set aside to pursue solo project Djo (check out the album ‘Twenty Twenty’ for another fantastic listen), Keery decided to take a break from touring with Post Animal. Since his partial departure, the band have continued to go from strength to strength, flowing along like their music and realising second full-length album ‘Forward Motion Godyssey’ earlier this year.

Although collectively coherent, Animal’s songs span a broad range of sounds and an extensive array of influences creep in across tracks. Upon initial listen, it’s hard not to feel like When I Get Home is cut from the same cloth as many well-loved Tame Impala tracks- but it’s by no means a copy thanks to the incorporation of some 70s rock elements. There’s also a Reckoner-Esque sound driving their eponymous track as well as songs like Safe or Not; kicking off with an initial acid house hit and transitioning into something reminiscent of Two Door Cinema Club and funk-fuelled How Do You Feel all on the same album. Not to mention the poppy stand out single Ralphie from the first album ‘When I Think Of You In A Castle’ and the likes of earlier track Lonely Jones that at times evokes a hint of ‘Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds’ (I could go on but I think you get the gist).

It’s hard not to shout about all of their songs, as each holds a place in my heart but it is clear to see that the band have grown over their years together. Certain elements of their self-produced tracks like captivating hooks and arpeggios came naturally to the guys from the get-go. However, a determination to cover such wide experimental ground meant that some of their earlier work was lacking a little lyrical direction. There was never an issue with this as their songs were still strong and got the ball rolling; it’s just more evident since they’ve truly come into their own. Progressing with a real ‘forward motion’ they’re now displaying more introspective lyrics whilst channelling a slightly darker sound which makes for an engrossing departure from the dream-like one fans were used and really dazzles.

It’s exciting to know that Post Animal have the self-awareness and skill to evolve as they have. This, combined with their ability to transport you to a summertime by a lake in the States (even during British autumn) and distort the lines between genres proves that they’re a class act and provides me with the faith that you’ll love them just as much as I do.

Check out Post Animal and Djo

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[…] However, it doesn’t stay linear and instead fades into a slow psychedelic squish that bands like Post Animal would be proud of, flipping the happy-go-lucky intro on its […]

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