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Why We Love: Katy J Pearson

Introducing Katy J Pearson, a dreamy singer-songwriter based in Bristol. Though her debut album was recently released on 13 November, she is no stranger to the music scene. She had previously been a part of a duo alongside her brother called ‘Ardyn’, but unfortunately, issues arose with the label. As a result, Katy took a lengthy break from music and songwriting as a whole, convinced she should become a gardener instead. Thankfully, she has made her comeback at long last, and people have already been captivated by the young singer.

Appropriately named, Return symbolizes her new chapter as a musician. The record consists of 10 tracks, each of which pull you into a trance that you don’t want to snap out of. Katy’s voice is simply mesmerizing, and like Stevie Nicks and Joni Mitchell, she is nothing short of a songbird.

Trading in the indie-pop style of Ardyn for a more folk-y, rock-and-roll sound that’s reminiscent of decades past, Katy has blossomed as a musician. She is now under Heavenly Recordings, and in an interview with NME, she states that she feels much more comfortable and confident with this label. 

Katy still writes with brother Rob, and their teamwork can be found in numerous songs on Return. “Take Back The Radio” and “Tonight” are two tracks that showcase their talents, and the pure, genuine magic they create is undeniable. When they were together as Ardyn, they credited Kate Bush and Kings of Leon as their influences, and some of those elements can be heard throughout the record. 

I stumbled upon the 24-year-old through an Instagram post from her label-mates, Working Men’s Club. Her 1970’s-esque album cover instantly caught my eye, and just by the look of it, I knew I had to stop what I was doing to give it a listen. Words are my forte, but I genuinely cannot describe how I felt as each track progressed. Her sound completely stands out in this modern age; she brings forth something new, something exciting, and something enchanting. 

I’m a massive fan of Fleetwood Mac, and Katy makes my heart absolutely flutter. Her music has that alluring Fleetwood-flare to it, but it’s still distinctively Katy. She flawlessly calls back to those sounds of the ‘70s while still staying true to herself and her own style.

Usually, I’m able to pick out my favorites very easily after listening to an album in its entirety. This time, however, is different. One moment, I’m set on “Something Real” as my top pick, and the next I’m telling everyone I know that “Waiting For The Day” is one of the most beautiful songs I’ve ever heard. It’s somewhat of a cycle that repeats with every track. One thing I am sure of, though, is that this is one of my favorite releases of the year.

Within a week of Return’s release, it has already been picked as BBC Radio 6’s Album of the Day and Amazing Radio’s Album of the Week. With this in mind, I am so certain that Katy will rack up even more awards and mentions for this record, so this is just the beginning—mark my words!

I wholeheartedly believe that everybody should listen to Return. I cannot stress enough how stunning it is, and considering the fact that this is just her debut as a solo artist, I am so incredibly eager to find out what else the singer’s got up her sleeve.

“What a weekend it’s been,” Katy writes in an Instagram post. “I am so overwhelmed by everyone’s kind words. Having this album out in the world feels truly wonderful.”

To keep up with Katy J Pearson, give her a follow on Twitter (@KatyJPearsonnn) and Instagram (@katyjpearsonband).

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[…] I know about this beautiful songstress. I even wrote a piece on her, which you can check out here (wink, wink). This record quickly became a top pick for me before I even finished it in its […]

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[…] fans of The Night Cafe and Katy J Pearson. Isabel Whelan, better known as BEL combines your typical indie sounds we’ve all come to love and […]

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