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Alien Chicks release new single ‘Woodlouse’

Experimental post-punk power trio Alien Chicks released their addictively catchy third single “Woodlouse” on Friday. The Brixton-based band sold out their Windmill Brixton launch party and played to a packed venue on Friday night, causing a big scramble for spare tickets. 

The launch was full of energy emanating from both the band and crowd, with a mosh pit throughout their set and more crowd surfers than we have ever witnessed at the Windmill. In matching three-piece costumes, Alien Chicks played a thrilling set, twisting and turning through elements of rap, ska, and jazz and touching on countless different time signatures, breaks and climaxes while maintaining a raw post-punk edge to their sound. 

Supported by the mysterious ‘The Kings’ Arms’ (The Queens’ Head), Gag Salon, and Neuroplacid, they topped off the night with a session of Windmill karaoke – an after-gig ritual they have become known for. Fans went home (or to the afterparty) filled with excitement, energy, and beer, armed with homemade Alien Chicks CDs scrawled with rude messages in the band’s handwriting.

As for their single, “Woodlouse” has an addictive hook packed full of energy and oomph with a menacing and sophisticated edge to the sound and lyrics. The taunting melodies of the backing vocals are juxtaposed beautifully to the darker reflections of lead vocalist Joe: “Sitting nodding like they’re bobble heads,” “Actions governed by a few,” “Acclimatising to the prejudice…” 

The band are teasing an exciting-looking music video to be released this week (which appears to feature the three of them wearing the matching costumes they wore at their single launch…). What’s next for Alien Chicks? October brings a series of buzzy support slots, with Peeping Drexels at the Lexington (7th), Headshrinkers at The Grace (13th), and The Rainbow Birmingham (22nd), and Pyjaen (28th). The band also signed with a booking agent and a publishing deal with Wipeout Publishing.

Photo: Lou Smith

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